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Posted 4 months ago
Na semana em que afinal ainda não são conhecidos os vencedores do concurso de wallpapers Jammi Jellifish o Diogo andou a melhorar a sua mestria em react, o Xubuntu anunciou o seu concurso de wallpapers e paralelamente mudou-se para para github e ... [More] transifex enquanto alguns utilizadores de UBPorts podem ouvir spotify ou a sua estação de rádio preferida… Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem! https://web.archive.org/web/20220307203939/https://xubuntu.org/news/xubuntu-22-04-community-wallpaper-contest/ https://web.archive.org/web/20220307203752/https://contest.xubuntu.org/terms/ https://web.archive.org/web/20220307204823/https://xubuntu.org/news/xubuntu-is-now-on-github/ https://web.archive.org/web/20220128134647/https://ubottu.com/meetingology/logs/xubuntu-devel/2020/xubuntu-devel.2020-05-19-21.02.log.html#l-120 https://github.com/Xubuntu https://www.transifex.com/xubuntu/public/ https://bugs.launchpad.net/bugs/+bugs?field.searchtext=&orderby=-importance&field.status%3Alist=NEW&field.status%3Alist=CONFIRMED&field.status%3Alist=TRIAGED&field.status%3Alist=INPROGRESS&field.status%3Alist=FIXCOMMITTED&field.status%3Alist=INCOMPLETE_WITH_RESPONSE&field.status%3Alist=INCOMPLETE_WITHOUT_RESPONSE&assignee_option=any&field.assignee=&field.bug_reporter=&field.bug_commenter=&field.subscriber=&field.tag=xubuntu&field.tags_combinator=ANY&field.status_upstream-empty-marker=1&field.has_cve.used=&field.omit_dupes.used=&field.omit_dupes=on&field.affects_me.used=&field.has_patch.used=&field.has_branches.used=&field.has_branches=on&field.has_no_branches.used=&field.has_no_branches=on&field.has_blueprints.used=&field.has_blueprints=on&field.has_no_blueprints.used=&field.has_no_blueprints=on&search=Search https://web.archive.org/web/20220217015834/https://xubuntu.org/contribute/ https://xubuntu.org/news/xubuntu-21-04-testing-week/ https://web.archive.org/web/20220307204235/https://xubuntu.org/news/xubuntu-21-04-testing-week/ https://xubuntu.org/contribute/qa/ https://wiki.xubuntu.org/qa/new_tester_start https://t.me/UbuntuTesters https://t.me/XubuntuDevelopment https://twitter.com/fredldotme/status/1499517862951768066 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Su1V7LeAOTY https://twitter.com/fredldotme/status/1500380913573806088 https://open-store.io/app/codium.vscodium.com https://open-store.io/app/it.mardy.fmradio https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3 https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3 https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal Apoios Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal. E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8. Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem. Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos. Atribuição e licenças Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino, Miguel e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast. A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da [CC0 1.0 Universal License](https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/). Este episódio e a imagem utilizada estão licenciados nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
Prologue As programmers and tech writers, we are creators, and we are knowledge workers. We strive to do rare and valuable work, regardless of the circumstances, what Dartmouth professor Cal Newport calls deep work. Deep work is hard and difficult. ... [More] At Canonical, we are specifically committed to doing things that are simultaneously hard and difficult, doing them all the time, and sustaining that work over long periods of time. Last week, we had an engineering sprint, which is a live gathering of Canonical’s engineering knowledge workers from all over the world. Normally, we have them every six months, but we hadn’t had one for almost exactly two years because of the Covid-19 pandemic. When he opened the sprint, our CEO began by speaking about the events in Ukraine, because these events were on everyone’s mind. Without addressing them, that weight wouldn’t be lifted and we couldn’t focus on doing good engineering work, live and in person, for an entire week. We would not be able to work deeply because of the creeping, subconscious distraction. Over the last two years, Canonical has worked extremely well, despite the horrifying spectre of a global pandemic, and our society moved almost seamlessly from pestilence into war. Even though we are people who pride ourselves on our technical focus and, often, on our agnostic view toward circumstance, we can’t help but be distracted by these issues. It affects our concentration, which thus affects our ability to do hard and difficult, rare and valuable things. Yet we at Canonical have done them. And we will continue to do them. And so can you, whether you are doing open-source on a paid or pro-bono basis, in daylight or moonlight, in the open or in secret. I can’t speak for other Canonical employees, but I can tell you about how I use technology to help me keep my head when all about me are losing theirs, to paraphrase Kipling. At Canonical, we want to be the best open-source company, ever, in the world, period. Much of that is technical in nature, but at least some of it is about how to use that technology to be good at open-source — in fact, to be good at anything that is hard and difficult, at any endeavor that strives to produce rare and valuable results. What follows is not intended to give you a prescription so much as meta-definition of what is possible. I’m going to show you how I use emacs org-mode to keep me sane, focused, and productive, even when the sense of impending chaos is higher than it has been in generations. Step one: know thyself Socrates said it best: Know thyself. You have to understand where your strengths and weaknesses lie, specifically with respect to distraction. Creators and knowledge workers experience pressure because creating is all about re-examining values. Creating means thinking long-term, about building things that will last and things that will change the world, and that kind of thinking is affected by bad news about the world, like a global pandemic or the first major war since the last one — one that was ended by nuclear weapons. Everybody experiences trauma differently, so everyone’s response to the distraction of fear must be heavily customized to their own unique strengths and weaknesses. Let me describe myself and my own weaknesses, not as a template, but as a vectored example. I am Bill Wear, netizen handle stormrider, callsign WA5149-SWL. I am a chaotic, neutral, creative, diabetic, technical communicator. I choose these dimensions because they completely describe how I react to trauma, and how I can best manage my emotions when despair threatens. By saying I am chaotic, I mean I use intuition more than logic. I am neutral because I don’t subscribe to dichotomies. I am creative because I think in pictures, animations, and scenarios. I am diabetic, which means I have a specific vulnerability to viruses — and to interruptions in the supply chain — which increase my concern in the interesting times. And I am a technical communicator because, to me, that’s the area where I can do hard and difficult work and, hopefully, and with some reasonable humility, produce rare and valuable results. And these attributes are enough to help me design my exoself. Step two: define your exoself The idea of an exoself comes from mythology, when the Greek gods appeared in various human and animal forms for various (usually nefarious) purposes. In popular mythology, there are three enduring plots that hinge on the exoself: “Neuromancer”, about Case, who lives a virtual life in cyberspace; “The Matrix”, about Neo, who lives a virtual life in a shared simulation; and “The Peripheral”, about Flynne, who lives a virtual life in an android body across time. For digital creators, we don’t want anything *quite* this radical. Instead, we want to live our virtual lives in an ordered, protected, and isolated way, so that we feel safe to focus and certain that when we disconnect, we won’t forget about the real world and its demands when the distractions kick up again. For me at least, and for most Emacs users, org-mode can help a lot, if you define your exoself properly. Let me show you how I define mine — again, as a vector, not a template. Because of my personal nature, I need five common objects: a pipe, to channel my creative resources into a coherent workflow. an axle, to give me a center of rotation and induce artificial gravity around what matters to me. a clothesline, to give me meaningful endpoints, and just enough flex to wobble without losing it. a telescope, to keep me focused on the end goal, and not distracted by lesser things. and a ground wire, to drain off my digressive thoughts into a storage battery without losing them. You may need different metaphors, but I encourage you to pick old-fashioned, common objects, because they anchor you in the mundane — which is the antidote to the kryptonite of anxiety. Step three: build your exoself An emacs “mode” is an editor overlay that changes the views and behaviors of a specific file type, but not other file types. You can have multiple files open, in multiple modes, all at the same time. I can have one window open in directory mode; one in org-mode; one in chronos mode; one in lisp mode; and one in org-agenda mode. All of these windows behave differently, have different context menus, and present in a way relevant to that file type. Smart outlining: the writer’s Excalibur Org is a super-smart outline, with folding, which is what I do all through the video above. It also permits easy rearrangement of even the longest outline section, which moves intact, regardless of how many sub-bullets you have. This is very handy for writing documents, since you can start with chaos and finish with organized thoughts. Personal organizer Org is also a personal organizer, with to-do items that can have TODO states, [#A] and priorities, and tags, :work: and can be scheduled by date, SCHEDULED: <2022-03-10 Thu> and time, SCHEDULED: <2022-03-10 Thu 09:00> and repeated every so many units of time, SCHEDULED: <2022-03-10 Thu 09:00 +3d> or on the next unit of time after it’s completed, SCHEDULED: <2022-03-10 Thu 09:00 .+3d> or …. Tables, too low high humalog units 85 120 0 120 150 2 150 180 4 180 220 6 220 250 8 250 280 10 280 310 12 311 plus call doctor Org has tables, like this insulin dosage sliding scale, which is a step function, which leads to constant over- and under-dosing, which leads to uneven blood sugar regulation, which leads to 62% apathy among diabetics — which is an apathy that has kicked up for me during these global crises. There are times I just want to eat chocolate, which is my personal kryptonite. And spreadsheets bsr units of humalog/lispro 180 3.62 But, saving the day, these tables can also be used as spreadsheets, like this bolus calculator I was able to design. It uses a slope-intercept equation (y = x \* .0457 – 4.606) derived from a year’s worth of personal blood sugar logs. I enter a blood-sugar reading, press a key chord, and I can dose precisely to the hundredths of a unit or smaller. And an agenda Org also has an agenda, which shows me a whole day, and where I can type quick shortcuts to update tasks: e to set effort , to set priority : to set tags t to set to-do states (using a lisp function I wrote myself) For example, when cancelling a task, org-mode hooks to a function I wrote that makes me put in a reason.  This makes me ashamed of being lazy over time and more willing to do the task when I should: mission accomplished. Also tracks habits Org mode can graphically track anything I designate as a habit. For example, I can use this feature to easily see how well I’ve done with various personal hygiene habits over the last few days. I can clock my work Org mode allows me to clock any task, and then produce summary reports to see how I’m doing. Right now, I’m trying to timebox my work on standard documentation against my work on yearly goals for our product, so both get done. The clock helps a lot, letting me see where I am and adjust when I get behind. I can even build and manage my website Everything on my personal website, stormrider.io, is edited in org-mode and then exported to my Web server.  In fact, org-mode can be exported, to just about any other format, including Google Docs. Step four: deploy your exoself Having an exoself is a great start, but what matters is how you use it. Here’s how I morph my own, org-mode exoself into the everyday objects I need. The pipe I use what I call an “habitual exoskeleton” to channel my creative resources into a coherent workflow. Essentially, I schedule almost everything into a timed agenda. I do this not for absolute scheduling or perfect sequencing — I rarely do the things at exactly the specified time, nor do I do them all in order. I don’t even do them all every day, depending on my needs and my mood. But over time, my behavior tends to be described by this exoskeleton. My life takes on the character of having done these things, consistently and daily, even when I’m inconsistent from day to day. The clothesline I use effort estimates for everything I do, and by using the clock, I improve these estimates every time I do something similar. I rarely get the estimate exactly, but again, over time, my behavior averages out to be predictable and repeatable. It also makes it easy to modify my agenda on the fly, when my time is limited or my schedule is scrambled (like at the sprint last week), because I can easily find things I can skip or defer to match time expended to time actually available. The axle I do something I call “cognizant deferral” of tasks to make sure I keep on top of things. Nearly everything that isn’t a discrete task is scheduled daily. I can work on each item a little every day, or I can defer things that can wait. The difference? I defer things with full awareness that I’m skipping them, without worrying about whether I’ll remember to come back to them, since daily repeats mean I’ll see them again tomorrow. Org’s agenda view also highlights things which were not touched yesterday, in a different color, so I can quickly see where I’m falling behind. And I never have to worry about those moments when I just throw something into a file — org-mode will sort it for me and put it in the right place in the agenda. Over time, this gives me the appearance of multitasking on several complex projects and keeping a lot of balls in the air, without dropping too many, which is not normal for someone with a chaotic mind. The telescope Org’s outline mode keeps me focused. Everything I do can be placed in an outline. Higher-level tasks can be given tags that are then inherited by lower-level tasks. Also, when I’m on a task, the bottom of the screen shows me a condensed waterfall, so I always know where each task fits in the overall scheme of things. I always know why I’m doing something, and this takes my mind instantly to the end goal. The ground wire/storage battery Org-mode offers ubiquitous capture. With a single keystroke from the agenda view, I can enter a new task into a capture buffer. If I take just enough time to schedule the task, so I’ll see it when it’s relevant, I can clear my short-term memory with minimal interruption, and without losing track of the task I’m working on. This makes it easy to capture random thoughts and interruptions with a minimum of distraction. For example, if I’m worried about world events, I can dismiss this worry by setting a reminder to look at the news at 8:30PM today, avoiding the rabbit-hole of surfing that would normally ensue. Epilogue This is just one person’s accommodation of his own mind. You have to adapt yourself to tools and needs, following a pattern like the one above, so that you can focus better and worry less. You can use almost the same tools and techniques with vim, nano, pico, Microsoft Word, Google Docs, or even pencil and paper. It’s just a matter of: understanding your pain points, and implementing specific patches that cover your weaknesses. And as knowledge workers and developers, we have an innate understanding of patches. As an open-source developer advocate, technical author, open-source contributor, and Canonical employee, I offer this little respite as a just a bit of hope and encouragement. The ability to finish the day feeling good about what you’ve personally done — regardless of how chaotic the world has been — makes things just a little better. And that makes our open-source community stronger in the long run. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
We are pleased to announce that Plasma 5.24.3 is now available in our backports PPA for Kubuntu 21.10 (Impish Indri). The release announcement detailing the new features and improvements in Plasma 5.24.3 can be found here. To ... [More] upgrade: Add the following repository to your software sources list: ppa:kubuntu-ppa/backports or if it is already added, the updates should become available via your preferred update method. The PPA can be added manually in the Konsole terminal with the command: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa/backports and packages then updated with sudo apt full-upgrade IMPORTANT Please note that more bugfix releases are scheduled by KDE for Plasma 5.24, so while we feel these backports will be beneficial to enthusiastic adopters, users wanting to use a Plasma release with more rounds of stabilisation/bugfixes ‘baked in’ may find it advisable to stay with Plasma 5.22 as included in the original 21.10 (Impish Indri) release. The Kubuntu Backports PPA for 21.10 also currently contains newer versions of KDE Gear (formerly Applications) and other KDE software. The PPA will also continue to receive updated versions of KDE packages other than Plasma, for example KDE Frameworks. Issues with Plasma itself can be reported on the KDE bugtracker [1]. In the case of packaging or other issues, please provide feedback on our mailing list [2], IRC [3], and/or file a bug against our PPA packages [4]. 1. KDE bugtracker: https://bugs.kde.org2. Kubuntu-devel mailing list: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-devel3. Kubuntu IRC channels: #kubuntu & #kubuntu-devel on irc.libera.chat4. Kubuntu ppa bugs: https://bugs.launchpad.net/kubuntu-ppa [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
40% of the 2021 Open Stack Survey respondents indicated Ubuntu as their primary OS. Houston, TX – February 2022 – cPanel® L.L.C., the Hosting Platform of Choice, a WebPros® portfolio company, is expanding its collaboration with Ubuntu to provide full ... [More] support for Ubuntu LTS 20.04 with cPanel & WHM version 102.  In the winter of 2020, CentOS 8 announced that it would be reaching its end-of-life in December of 2021. This news was somewhat unexpected in the open-source and web hosting worlds. In response, cPanel has been working towards providing solutions that will benefit our partners and customers and expand options as we move forward together. Our Commitment to Growth Aila Power, VP of Product Development, said: “Ubuntu is a solid Linux Distribution with a great track record of security and innovation. I’m really excited that cPanel & WHM are now available on this distro that is the first choice for many when they build a new application”. We provide greater Operating System (OS) diversity, more substantial stability, and increased safety for our customers and their customers.  Our collaboration with Ubuntu will give cPanel & WHM users more open-source Linux distribution architecture options within their current infrastructure while providing a more robust business suite of solutions to help customers scale and expand their business hosting operations.  “Ubuntu has long been the platform of choice for large scale compute estates and Canonical are delighted to partner with cPanel to mitigate the impact on long term stability and predictability brought about by the changes to CentOS” shared Mark Lewis, VP of Application Services, at Canonical | Ubuntu. Ubuntu shared statistics from their 2020 HackerEarth Developer Survey, highlighting 66% of experienced developers and 69% of students prefer Ubuntu over other Linux distributions. For those looking for the most significant amount of the latest open-source software to work with, Ubuntu is a solid option.  For example, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS comes with over 30,000 open-source packages such as Python, Ruby, Go, Java, Apache, Nginx, PostgreSQL, MySQL, Node.js, PHP, and more.  These are some reasons why Ubuntu continues to grow in popularity as one of the most popular Linux distributions.  Since its inception, Ubuntu has consistently gained market share, reaching almost 50%. Now is an excellent time if you have been thinking about trying Ubuntu.  Ubuntu is currently supported on our EDGE Tier, intended for testing or non-production environments. Having received excellent feedback from EDGE users, and in anticipation of fully supporting Ubuntu when cPanel & WHM v102 goes to RELEASE in Q1, we are pleased to announce that cPanel will provide 5 years of complimentary support through April 2025. What is Ubuntu LTS? LTS, or Long-Term Support, means that a version of the operating system is supported and patched by the developer for a minimum of five years. Canonical releases a new LTS version every two years, with thousands of security patches applied to each version through their lifecycles making Ubuntu LTS predictable, stable, and secure. Ubuntu has several similarities to CentOS, but with some notable differences that benefit specific situations. For example, development or application hosting utilizing more modern technology may find Ubuntu a preferred Linux distribution. Single-user servers may also particularly benefit. What This Means for You As our partners and customers continue to investigate and execute their upgrade plans due to the CentOS announcement, we remain committed to providing as smooth of a transition as possible. Additionally, we are taking the necessary steps to mitigate any single vendor risk to cPanel support in the future. By supporting multiple Linux distros from different OS vendors, any unexpected end-of-life announcements from third parties in the future will no longer be as impactful. About Canonical  As the company behind the Ubuntu Project, Canonical is the publisher of Ubuntu, the OS for most public cloud workloads, and the emerging categories of smart gateways, self-driving cars, and advanced robots. Canonical provides enterprise security, support, and services to commercial users of Ubuntu. Established in 2004, Canonical is a privately held company. Media Contact: pr@canonical.com About cPanel, L.L.C. As a leader in the hosting management industry, cPanel provides one of the Internet infrastructure industry’s most reliable and intuitive web hosting automation software platforms. With its rich feature set and customer-first support, the fully automated hosting platform empowers infrastructure providers and gives customers the ability to administer every facet of their website using simple point-and-click software.  Media Contact: cPanel, L.L.C. Jamie Swartz Director of Strategic Communications & Brand Media.relations@webpros.com  [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 725 for the week of February 27 – March 5, 2022. The full version of this issue is available here. In this issue we cover: Call for nominations: Developer Membership Board Ubuntu Stats Hot in ... [More] Support LoCo Events Vote for the Jammy Jellyfish 22.04 Wallpaper Competition! Ubuntu Testing Week March 3rd-10th Linux Gaming in 2022 Other Community News Ubuntu Cloud News Canonical News In the Blogosphere Featured Audio and Video Meeting Reports Upcoming Meetings and Events Updates and Security for 18.04, 20.04, and 21.10 And much more! The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by: Krytarik Raido Bashing-om Chris Guiver Wild Man And many others If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki! Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
One could aptly name this February State of IoT as the State of Silicon. With the much-anticipated partnership between ARM and NVIDIA halting to a grind, Intel grabbed this month’s headlines by investing in the open RISC-V architecture and ... [More] announcing a new fund promoting disruptive startups. Let’s dive straight in! Ferrari partners with Qualcomm   Software is reshaping the world of automotive. Software-defined vehicles nowadays update their functionalities through over-the-air (OTA) software updates. Those updates are transactional for reliability and with deltas to minimize network traffic. Early in February, Ferrari announced a compelling partnership with Qualcomm. Qualcomm, the publisher of the popular DragonBoard 410c Development Board and one of the silicon leaders, aims to usher the ongoing digital transformation in automotive. Their Snapdragon Digital Chassis is certain to play a key role in underpinning the connected car of the coming decades.  [1] Partnering with Qualcomm, Ferrari vowed to start exploring digital cockpit solutions for rich graphics and an immersive infotainment experience. Intel invests in Risc-V In the past decade, open-source and open standards have reshaped the world of technology and produced long-lasting results. RISC-V is a new paradigm for Open Source hardware, developing a free and open Instruction Set Architecture (ISA). The ISA holds the promise of increasingly rapid processor innovation through open standard collaboration. Thanks to its availability on a wide range of processors, from low-end microcontrollers to high-end server-grade processors, RISC-V is empowering a new era of processor innovation with rapid industry-wide adoption. Combining the best open-source architecture with the best open-source operating system, porting Ubuntu on RISC-V further facilitates the adoption of novel computing architectures. Intel investment in RISC-V was one of the most intriguing headlines of last February. As part of a vibrant ecosystem driving innovation at the edge, Intel and its IoT technology partners work together to promote the deployment of high-performance devices. As Ubuntu optimised for Intel processors is already accelerating the adoption of IoT innovations, Intel’s support for the RISC-V ISA is a strong indication of its commitment to continued investments in open standards and collaboration. Intel sets up $1 billion fund Confirming its presence at the cutting-edge of innovation, this February Intel announced a new $1 billion fund to aid “companies building disruptive technologies “.  The vision for the fund is to accelerate Intel Foundry customers’ time to market and facilitate the adoption of modular design approaches spanning toolchains and innovative chip architectures. Among the support for the “full spectrum of chip architectures”, the press release mentioned x86, Arm and RISC-V.  SiFive, the commercial entity behind RISC-V, also announced support for Intel’s fund, aiming to extend its open-standard mandate. The collaboration is broader than a close partnership between Intel and SiFive, as it embraces several players in the ecosystem. Esperanto Technologies develops energy-efficient AI acceleration solutions on top of the RISC-V ISA. The company partnered with Intel Foundry Services to advance massively-parallel 64-bit RISC-V-based AI/ML workloads. Similarly, Ventana Micro provides high-performance chiplets and early this month announced a strategic partnership with Intel for broader commercialisation of its RISC-V cores. NVIDIA-ARM deal collapses News from the silicon world dominated the IoT landscape in February. NVIDIA’s acquisition of Arm, announced in September 2020, was expected to reshape trillion-dollar industries and thrust innovations across the compute spectrum.  NVIDIA invented the GPU in 1999, ushering the growth of parallel computing for the decades to follow. Arm is at the forefront of computing, powering billions of devices and arguably the most relevant CPU architecture of the upcoming years.  The transaction would have placed both parties at the heart of global leadership across a spectrum of state-of-the-art tech stacks. The aim of creating the world’s premier computing company for the age of the internet of things and tightly embedded, connected devices fell through this February. The two partners decided to conclude the Agreement because of “significant regulatory challenges” discouraging the fulfilment of the deal. Arm will now commence preparations for listing on the Nasdaq. AMD acquires Xilinx While one transaction terminated among regulatory challenges, another industry-shaking acquisition went through. Announced in October 2020, AMD’s acquisition of Xilinx poses them as the leading high-performance and adaptive computing company in the industry. AMD completed its acquisition in February 2022, broadening its spectrum of products, including CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, and Adaptive SoCs. Xilinx, now the Adaptive and Embedded Computing Group under AMD, is the inventor of the latter two adaptive processing platforms. AMD, on the other hand, is now expected to capitalize on a TAM of approximately $135 billion in 2023. [2] Alder Lake N specs revealed If you are familiar with Intel Alder Lake processors, low-power and low-cost may make you think of ultra-thin laptops. Energy efficiency matters also for constrained boards where the per-device fee is a serious concern. Many factors, from flash storage to DRAM, mandate manufacturers to be the smallest possible when operating at the low-end of the IoT spectrum. What concerns those producers is how to get the cheapest hardware to place it competitively in the market, and the per-device fee is often crucial in the conversation. The news that Intel Alder-Lake N will feature energy-efficient Gracemont cores rapidly spread across the embedded world. By analysing commits related to Alder Lake-N and boot logs in the SOF Project, one can expect Intel’s upcoming processors to include an integrated GPU with 32 execution units, PCIe interfaces and LPDRR5 memory support. Arguably, the Gracemont cores with Intel UHD Gen12 graphics will result in optimized performance compared to Elkhart Lake and Jasper Lake processors. Although Intel has neither unveiled Alder Lake-N nor argued its market positioning, the new processors family is foreseen to power embedded systems for some years to come. Stay tuned for more IoT news We will soon be back with next month’s summary of IoT news. Thanks for reading! In case you missed it, here is a recap of IoT news from last January. Make sure to check it out! Further reading Searching for a short primer on embedded Linux? Look no further than this blog post. Why is Linux the OS of choice for embedded systems? Find out with the ultimate guide to Linux for embedded applications. In this exclusive webinar, you will learn more about the embedded landscape, the IoT and how Ubuntu Core is raising the bar for embedded Linux.Want to learn more about the difference between real-time and embedded Linux? Dive into the mini-series on the low latency Linux kernel. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
In the last few weeks the FIPS profile has become available for the Ubuntu Pro 20.04 images for AWS, Azure and Google Cloud Platform. The FIPS profile for Ubuntu 20.04 was already available on on premise environments through Ubuntu Advantage for ... [More] Infrastructure. Ubuntu 20.04 FIPS includes cryptographic validated modules that enable organisations to run and develop applications for the US public sector and Federal government, including regulated industries such as healthcare and finance. How to get Ubuntu Pro FIPS? You can get the Ubuntu Pro FIPS image from the following pages: Ubuntu Pro FIPS for AWS Ubuntu Pro FIPS for Azure Ubuntu Pro FIPS for GCP Ubuntu Pro is available pay-as-you-go billing on your existing cloud invoice. If you are going to run a large number of nodes or require dedicated support please reach out to us and we can work on a private offer to better assist your infrastructure needs. Want to know more about FIPS on Ubuntu? If you want to know more about FIPS on Ubuntu we have a dedicated landing page and documentation on our website. From these pages you find the links to the certificates on the NIST website. The NIST certificate pages include the security policies, which are documents that contain important information on how the packages must be used in order to ensure FIPS compliance for your workloads. If you have a specific question or want to know more how Ubuntu Pro FIPS can help you meet your security compliance requirements you can contact us and a member of our technical/commercial team will be able to assist you.  Which other features does Ubuntu Pro offer? Ubuntu Pro is a premium cloud image delivering comprehensive open source security and compliance. Ubuntu Pro is suitable for small to large-scale Linux enterprise operations and it includes the following security and compliance features: Main features of Ubuntu Pro The main features of Ubuntu Pro are: CIS and DISA STIG – For companies looking to leverage industry benchmarks for hardening, Ubuntu Pro makes two leading implementation guides available. Kernel Livepatch – Ubuntu kernel updates are regularly issued. With our Livepatch service, kernel patches are delivered immediately, without the need for reboot. 10-year lifetime – Canonical backs Ubuntu Pro for 10 years, ensuring security updates are available throughout, with a guaranteed upgrade path Optional 24/7 support – Additional enterprise-grade support available through private offer for Ubuntu Pro. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
No episódio 184: dispositivos e integrações Zigbee, opções para routers abertos, robots de limpeza mais livres, mudanças no show contribuídas pela comunidade, Telegram, release do 20.04.4, eleições para a Fundação UBports, o Planet Computers Astro ... [More] Slide 5G com UBports Ubuntu Touch. Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem! https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3 https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3 https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal Apoios Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal. E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8. Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem. Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos. Atribuição e licenças Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino, Miguel e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast. A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da [CC0 1.0 Universal License](https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/). Este episódio e a imagem utilizada estão licenciados nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
No episódio 184: dispositivos e integrações Zigbee, opções para routers abertos, robots de limpeza mais livres, mudanças no show contribuídas pela comunidade, Telegram, release do 20.04.4, eleições para a Fundação UBports, o Planet Computers Astro ... [More] Slide 5G com UBports Ubuntu Touch. Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem! https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/jammy-jellyfish-22-04-wallpaper-competition/26388 https://twitter.com/ubuntu/status/1498239541559414790 https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Ubuntu-20.04.4-LTS https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-announce/2022-February/000277.html https://twitter.com/planetcom2017/status/1497949329675493387 https://twitter.com/planetcom2017/status/1498239923467563008 https://twitter.com/AyanoTDO/status/1498201019385364481 https://twitter.com/AyanoTDO/status/1498188538189422593 https://twitter.com/benwood/status/1498260097386131457 https://www.www3.planetcom.co.uk/ https://store.planetcom.co.uk/products/astro-slide?variant=41399314677954 https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3 https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3 https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal Apoios Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal. E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8. Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem. Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos. Atribuição e licenças Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino, Miguel e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast. A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da [CC0 1.0 Universal License](https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/). Este episódio e a imagem utilizada estão licenciados nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização. [Less]
Posted 4 months ago
Austin, Texas – 3rd of March 2022 – OpenStack is dead! A masked man in a black cloak with “public clouds”, “containers” and ”serverless” inscriptions shot OpenStack straight in the heart. OpenStack fell to the ground and with the last moment of ... [More] strength exclaimed: “Long live open infrastructure”! That could be a headline of a tabloid, would you agree? OpenStack is dead. We’ve all heard about that. It’s gone. It’s abandoned. It’s been dominated by public clouds. The world does no longer need OpenStack. The word only needs containers, serverless or the next cutting-edge technology (whatever it’s going to be). The world doesn’t like OpenStack anymore. OpenStack is an obsolete technology. It is antiquated, passe and definitely no longer sexy. What is the problem then? Well, the problem is that none of these things is real. OpenStack in numbers Before we move any further, let’s step back for a while and consider objective and independent statistics around OpenStack. The most popular open-source cloud platform According to Statista, OpenStack is the most popular open-source cloud platform and its adoption has grown steadily in recent years. As of 2020, 30% of survey respondents confirmed that they are using OpenStack in production. Source: https://www.statista.com/ One of the three biggest open source projects As mentioned many times by the Open Infrastructure Foundation, OpenStack continues to be one of the three most actively developed open-source projects in the world. Only the Linux kernel and Chromium achieve the same level of contribution. More than 25M of cores in production Based on the OpenStack User Survey results from 2021 there are more than 25M cores running in production now on the top of the OpenStack-based infrastructure. The deployments vary from a few to thousands of nodes. More than 100 production clouds deployed in 2021 According to the same survey, more than 100 production OpenStack clouds were deployed in 2021. Despite the global pandemic and uncertainty on the market, OpenStack has managed to grow and survive the difficult times. A mature project celebrating its 12-year anniversary OpenStack was originally founded in 2010, meaning it’s going to celebrate its 12-year anniversary this year. That is a lot in the software space. How many other so mature open-source software projects could you call? Linux, Bash, Vim, KVM … Its global business grows at the CAGR of 29% Based on the report by Market Research Future, OpenStack continues to grow at the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 29%. Its global business, including solutions and services, is expected to reach $8M in 2023. Source: https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/ Who uses OpenStack? Where do these numbers come from? Who uses OpenStack then? In short, telcos, local service providers, hardware manufacturers, car manufacturers, financial institutions, government institutions and companies in retail, transportation and healthcare industries. OpenStack is actively being used across various market sectors all over the world. The following are examples of companies that deployed Charmed OpenStack in 2021 together with Canonical.  OpenStack as an NFVI On the 5th of November 2020 MTS – Russia’s largest mobile operator and a leading provider of media and digital services – announced the selection of Canonical’s Charmed OpenStack to power the company’s next-generation cloud infrastructure. MTS leverages Charmed OpenStack’s advanced lifecycle management capabilities and flexible cloud-native architecture to better enable multi-vendor and cross-platform integration. Victor Belov, CTO at MTS, said: “The selection of OpenStack is another step forward in our strategy to migrate towards open source software. Building an ecosystem based on OpenStack will speed up our technology adoption, lay a foundation for future 5G rollout, and enhance our network’s edge compute capabilities. This solution will also enable us to improve virtualization cost effectiveness, as well as expand our ability to leverage a wide variety of virtual platforms.”. Read the announcement > OpenStack as a local public cloud In 2022 Nayatel – one of Pakistan’s leading telecom provider who was first to offer FTTH, HD and 4K video on demand and online gaming optimisation – completed the deployment of Pakistan’s first local public cloud. Aiming to meet the demand for a homegrown public cloud service, Nayatel partnered with Canonical to build an enterprise-grade OpenStack platform. The new public cloud is the country’s first truly cost-effective service to deliver the same level of capabilities as big-name global cloud competitors, while also offering the security, low latency, and superior customer service that can only come from a local provider. Jahanzeb, VP Operations at Nayatel, said: “The cloud ecosystem in Pakistan is relatively underdeveloped. There are a number of providers, but their services are either prohibitively expensive or unable to deliver the technical capabilities that people expect. As a result, we had a lot of customers approach us and say they were being forced to use cloud providers outside Pakistan.”. Download the case study > OpenStack as a general-purpose private cloud  With researchers increasingly relying on the university’s OpenStack platform for their work, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) switched in 2021 away from its homegrown solution and adopt third-party support. Ubuntu familiarity alongside superior economics made Charmed OpenStack and Ubuntu Advantage the natural choice for KAUST. With OpenStack and Kubernetes supported by Canonical, the university has eliminated the complexity from managing, scaling, and upgrading its cloud environment, while delivering the high levels of availability and performance that researchers need. Arindam Chakraborty, Senior Systems Specialist at KAUST said: “Canonical was just a natural fit with what we were already running. The software would be the same, just configured and optimized differently, so we could continue to leverage our existing knowledge. What’s more, Canonical offered the best server/annum cost on the market for the level of support we were looking for, and we could fully utilise our existing hardware and networking with no extra costs.“. Download the case study > Is OpenStack dead? So is OpenStack dead? Of course, it’s not. In fact, OpenStack is doing very well. It continues to be developed. It continues to be supported. And it continues to be widely adopted by various types of organisations all over the world. Why do we keep hearing that OpenStack is dead if it is obviously not the case? Because it is no longer at the forefront of technology. It’s hidden in the depths of data centres, serving as a foundation for Kubernetes, AI/ML stack and telco NFV.  Same as many other open-source technologies. Same as KVM, for example. Is KVM at the forefront of technology these days? Of course, it’s not. Yet it powers the entire Google Cloud with millions of workloads running there every day. It is important to separate hype from real usage when considering technology adoption, and OpenStack is a really good example of that. Explore OpenStack Now that you’ve learned that OpenStack is a living thing and has a bright future ahead, you might be wondering where to find more information about it. Here are some useful links for you: Visit our website to better understand the value that OpenStack brings to various types of organisations worldwide or get in touch with Canonical directly, Watch this webinar to learn more about OpenStack, its history, architecture, key services and how do they work together, Try OpenStack by following a series of our tutorials for beginners. OpenStack installs in just 2 commands and the entire process takes around 20 minutes. Remember, the future of OpenStack is in your hands! [Less]