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Posted about 11 years ago
Once again another interesting and informative day at the ELN Workshop in Amsterdam.The topics of discussion in the final day were compliance, risk, patents and industry development. Different organizations made presentations in the ... [More] morning regarding licensing compliance and how it pertains to the internal part of the organization, as well as, through to distribution. Intra-organization compliance systems were discussed in short and the various mediums that could be used in order to insure that the vendor(s) is complaint. Most all were in agreement that it was vital for an organization to integrate a compliance policy into the supply chain. Different measures on how this compliance policy could be constructed were discussed also.The second topic discussed was Risk and how to evaluate and contain it. A balanced discussion on risk from both the legal and business sides of things gave a realistic case view on what open source companies are facing in the current and expanding market. Members of the ELN have also created and are developing a Risk Grid to address procurement of F/OSS and it's function within the supply chain. This grid aims to assist professionals in the field to regulate their actions with their suppliers and buyers by allocating  risk to the appropriate actor within the supply chain.A patent panel also discussed briefly about the pro's and con's of patents within the organization and argued how these patents can hinder, as well as, support innovation within an organization. The affects of patents on licensing and the various complications that arise were also discussed, but agreed that another workshop will be set aside to discuss patents in more detail.Finally, Future developments were discussed and their impacts on the F/OSS industry. Technological innovations and shifts were discussed and weighed against the developments of the F/OSS movement in the past. We are seeing quite a shift from software as a product to more of a service driven industry with such developments as the cloud and embedded MID's. Awareness must be made now that assists professionals in evaluating legal risk in accordance to licensing and procurement, through educating professionals on the importance of compliance and how to properly implement a compliance policy within their respective organizations. Moreover, it is generally agreed that there must be more interaction with developers/engineers and management/legal counsel to work together and build a "best case" practice that incorporates the developer/engineers issues and needs together with the organizations compliance. The most sound method of accomplishing this is through working together to reach our common goal with special emphasis on proper education and documentation.I would like to thank the Free Software Foundation Europe and everyone who attended the ELN workshop and especially thank them for allowing me to participate in this closed discussion. It definitely opened  my eyes to topics in which I have only scratched the surface on. The complexities of the topics discussed were just another confirmation that we need to work even harder together to meet the ever growing issues faced by all levels of the F/OSS movement. I look forward to working together with you at the ELN and sharing the knowledge and contributions from the unique position I hold between industry and community. [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
Sorry about this post being quite belated, but I have been wanting to make this post for quite a while. This last May (11-14th) I attended LinuxTage in Berlin where it is hosted every year. It was my first time at the event and many of my hacker ... [More] colleagues gave me mixes feelings about the event before I attended. There complaints with the event were that over the years that it has become more corporate oriented and that community presence has been less regarded over corporate interest when arranging and planning for community presence (booths, etc.).I always try to keep and open mind when attending an event i which I have never been to before, so I arrived at the event on the 11th with a business colleague of mine to introduce him to the world of FOSS to see his thoughts on it, but more to try and give him a picture of what I have been investing a lot of my time into over the past 3 years. He, like many others, rarely see the point of FOSS and the meaning behind just having another operating system on your computer. As many others I have spoken to over the years, he had a hard time understanding why he should give FOSS a try when he had no problems with using Windows. My strategy was to just introduce him to the ecosystem and let him make his own assumptions on what he saw and then provide answers and support to the questions he had.As we entered the exhibition hall, the first time, he was reluctant from the beginning and THEN he saw names of projects he was familiar with which he did not know stemmed from our ecosystem. Projects he used on windows, such as VLC, XMBC, to name a few. He then shifted his opinion to being a little less reluctant and began to open his mind a little more to this FOSS thing. We split up for a while, as I told him to get involved, ask questions, and just look around! In the meantime, I visited my old colleagues at the Fedora Project and CentOS to see how they are doing. Furthermore, I had a good talk with the Debian project about their plans, future development, and got all of of my questions answered in a nice informed way about the CUT/Rolling release initiative. In final, as always, I also had a chance to chat with some community managers and discuss some issues facing our communities and ecosystem and how we can improve cross-community collaboration.Overall it was quite a decent event, I met some new people, got up to speed with the old and planted a seed in someones mind of what opportunities and tools FOSS can give the average individual and business person, but I will have to agree with my hacker colleagues, it was a little to corporate and presented itself as more of a hybrid event rather than a community one. Berlin, in itself is awesome, one of my favorite cities in the world, since there are just not too many places like it ;-) C-Base is also one of a kind hacker meeting place/lab which definitely demonstrates the unique qualities of this city and the local FOSS community in Berlin. Oh, and not to forget, my business colleague left with a greater understanding of our ecosystem and a smile on his face, so I think that speaks for itself ;-) Will be seeing you again shortly, Berlin, that I can guarantee!! [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
I attended  HCC linux day on Saturday the 21st of May in Bunnick, The Netherlands. I have always wanted to see how the local communities present themselves at events in the NL, since I mainly attend the international events. HCC is one of the ... [More] largest, if not the largest, communities in the NL comprised of members that use a variety of different distros and projects that support development within the FOSS ecosystem. This event's focus was on Security and was hosted at the Postillion Hotel.I first arrived at the event at 10:00 and was quite impressed with the venue for such a small event. It was easy to get to (by car at least) and the hotel was quite new, which provided a quaint, by specialized feel. The presentation rooms were new and fitted with new equipment which gave the event an added feeling of style and prestige. I decided to attend some presentations held by Jos Poortvliet, the community manager for openSUSE whom introduced the new initiatives (OBS, SUSEStudio, Tumbleweed, Evergreen) and the different desktops that are supported in openSUSE latest release 11.4 within the course of two separate presentations. I also got a chance to visit the openSUSE booth, which seemed to have quite a buzz going around it and Jos was nice enough to introduce me to his local team which consisted of some new members who looked very enthusiastic about the event and being involved in the openSUSE community. I also had a chance to speak to some of the local contributors, some from Ubuntu and others who were developers, gamers and just interested users. Many of the people attending this event had been users of FOSS for quite a while, either as a hobby or in their work. I had a feeling that actually most could be classified as users and not your hardcore developer types. I see absolutely no problem with this as these users help spread the message and play a part in keeping the ecosystem alive.Overall, I really liked the event since I was able to speak to people who are not quite your "normal" FOSSies and saw aspects of our communities from a different point of view, which is always refreshing. In addition, this was quite a low key event, so it also carried a very relaxed feeling to it :-) There is still a need for these types of events, as there are for the events on other levels, since these events provide access points for people of all types to get involved in FOSS. Especially the locals, whom cannot or do not want to travel far to get their questions answered and to hang out with those that share the same interest ;-)Thanks again HCC, I enjoyed the event and look forward to attending another event of yours. Also a great thanks to Jos and the local Lizards for the constructive discussions, openness, and engagement demonstrated by the openSUSE team.  [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
As promised a little look into the future: I will be attending the openSUSE conference in Nürnberg, Germany in 10 days. This years conference topic/focus is RWX3, which places a heavy emphasis on hands-on workshops and BoF's.  It should be a great ... [More] conference with many side activities and a Wild West themed social event. I also hear that there will be some cooking workshops which I definitely want to be a part of, since I have a great interest in cooking and have cooked professionally for several years, as well as, with and for many hackers and community members over the years and they love it :-) Now,  this is the type of diversity and creativity all communities need to embrace!In addition to my attendance, I  will also be presenting a workshop entitled 'Introduction to Cross-cultural Communication, Conflict and Collaboration' on Sunday the 9th of September from 14:30 to 15:50 in Salon Brendl. This workshop will definitely be hands-on and will include a conflict simulation which all attendees will take part in to help better understand their fellow contributors, as well as, themselves. I also look forward to learning more about Greg KH's initiative and future plans with Tumbleweed at his talk on Monday. More information on my presentation and all others including the full timetable can be found here.  It looks to be a pretty full timetable filled with hands-on sessions, so this event is sure to yield significant outcomes. I look forward to meeting with those colleagues and contributors with whom I have met before, as well as, those new faces I have never met before, to have discussions and launch initiatives that support collaboration, organization and healthy community development. Most of all, I just look forward to (GTD) Getting Things Done!See you there! [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
This is not really a blog post. I just would like to know you opinion on state of MySQL at openSUSE and openSUSE Build Service. But I’m interested in your feedback even if you are not using openSUSE or even if you are not using packages I provide. As ... [More] my TODO is quite long and I can’t do everything, I would like to know what should I pay the most attention to. Later I will publish a post about the current state of MySQL and how you can participate [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News Issue 196. openSUSE Weekly News openSUSE Weekly News Team 196 Edition Legal Notice This work (compilation) is licenced under Creative Commons ... [More] attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The rights for the compilation itself are copyright by Sascha Manns. Opt-Out: If you are an Author and don’t want to be included in the openSUSE Weekly News, just send a Mail to: <news@opensuse.org>. Copyrights of the referenced articles are owned by original authors or copyright owners. If you want to reuse those articles, ask each original copyright owner which license should be applied. We don’t reprint any Article without a free license, we just introduce it then under the Agreement of the German Copyright Law. If you are an author and want to set your blog under a free License just visit: http://goo.gl/Tw3td We are thanking the whole openSUSE Weekly News Team and the open-slx gmbh for spending time and power into the openSUSE Weekly News. Published: 2011-10-09 Table of Contents Announcements Board Election 2011 Hackweek VII Status Updates Team Reports In the Community Postings from the Community Welcome new openSUSE Members Events & Meetings openSUSE for your Ears Communication Contributors Games Corner Security Updates Kernel Review Tips and Tricks For Desktop Users For Commandline/Script Newbies For Developers and Programmers For System Administrators Planet SUSE openSUSE Forums On the Web Reports LOL Feedback Credits Acknowledgements Copyrights List of our Licenses Trademarks Translations We are pleased to announce our 196 issue of the openSUSE Weekly News. You can also read this issue in other formats here. Enjoy reading :-) Announcements▼ “ openSUSE 12.1 Beta Arrives! The much-awaited Beta release of openSUSE 12.1 is here! And just in time for your weekend Beta Pizza Party. So fire up that oven and warm up that download manager because its time to get ready for the latest awesome openSUSE on your computer. (…) ” “ Hackweek results for openSUSE ARM Last Friday Dirk Müller send an email to openSUSE-Factory about the status of the openSUSE ARM port. SUSE employees Adrian, Alexander, Dirk and Reinhard had spend their Hackweek revitalizing the initial work by Jan-Simon and Martin by getting openSUSE Factory on ARM to build and work. The current build status on OBS shows that almost 2500 packages are working successfully and the team invites anyone interested to come and help increase that number! ” Board Election 2011▲▼ “ openSUSE Board Election Committee Formed The 2011 openSUSE Board term is soon coming to an end. In the last few project meetings as well as at the conference, the board has called for people to step up for the Election Committee. Five openSUSE contributors have offered their help and we’d like to introduce them to you. The Team The openSUSE Board is proud to welcome the following members of our openSUSE Community as this year’s Election Committee: Izabel Valverde Kai-Uwe Behrmann James Mason Kostas Koudaras Thomas Schmidt The Job In the coming days and weeks, this committee will act independently to implement a formal plan for the oversight and election of a new Board for the 2012 term. Currently, three board seats will be up for election. These seats are currently held by Rupert Horstkotter, Pavol Rusnak, and Bryen Yunashko (whose seat is vacated due to term limits.) The Election Committee will announce the nomination process and election period as part of the election plan. Please stay tuned for further news from the Committee itself. We are sure this team will perform its duties to the best benefit of the openSUSE Project and we look forward to an exciting election term and seeing many openSUSE Community members stepping up as candidates in the upcoming election. ” Hackweek VII▲▼ “ Sankar P: Telepathic Flirt With Chromium Hackweek is an event in SUSE where developers can work on any pet project for a week (like Google’s 20%) This year’s edition happened last week in SUSE. Since I am part of the openSUSE community, I too participated in the spirit of this event in my night time. The project is codenamed Arattai. I tried to bring a prototype to provide IM/Chat support built-in to the Chromium browser. Watch the screencast below. Please click here in case you do not see the embedded video. Please see the video in full screen HD. ” “ Tor Lillqvist: Hack Week, Autumn 2011 During this hack week I worked on making LibreOffice build also against the MacOSX 10.5, 10.6 and 10.7 SDKs. We had some support for that in the configure.in already, but it had apparently never been tested what then happens if one actually tries something other than the 10.4 SDK. Mostly, with some changes here and there, and except for 10.7, I got it to work, and also the resulting LibreOffice built against the 10.6 SDK seemed to work. Building against the 10.7 SDK fails because some APIs that were deprecated already in 10.4, but the Mac code in LibreOffice still uses, have now then finally been removed in the 10.7 SDK. This shows the sad state of our Mac code. I also experimented with building against the 10.6 SDK but with MacOSX 10.4 as the target OS API level. I didn’t get such a build to finish yet, but I am continuing on it in the background. The idea here is that if it would be possible to build LO to run fine on 10.4 even if you build it using the 10.6 SDK, we could get rid of one requirement for our (at least Intel) Mac build that is getting more and more silly: That you need to install the old Xcode 3 (with 10.4 and 10.5 SDKs) in addition to, or instead of, the current Xcode 4 (with 10.6 and 10.7 SDKs). ” “ Noel Power: hackweek #7 oletool.py Last year for some reason that I can’t recall I only managed to take 1 day of hackweek, back then I started oletool.py. oletool.py is intended to be like a cheap & nasty (zip/unzip)-like command-line tool for OLE compound documents. I started this for 2 reasons I often play with Libreoffice filters, many times I want to either extract some stream or other from a document to examine it or maybe quickly modify a stream re-inject it into the document to test some code or theory Libreoffice has support for Python, I know nothing about Python and I wanted to learn a new scripting language ( I know I could have used libgsf for this tool – maybe something for some spare cycles ) So, has to be said I wasn’t starting completely from scratch, Kohei already created mso-dumper for dumping the content of Excel documents in python. Last year I was happy with my one day’s work, I managed using Kohei’s mso-dumper code to quickly cobble together a tool that allowed the contents of the document to be displayed ( ala gsf list type format ) and also extract one or more streams. (…) ” Status Updates▲▼ Team Reports Build Service Team Build Service Statistics. Statistics can found at Buildservice GNOME Team “ Nelson Marques: openSUSE 12.1 delivers GTK 3.2 with Broadway backend! On the 25th of September 2001, Mathias Clasen announces the release of GTK 3.2.0. This release includes delivers: Many improvements to the CSS theming support; Width-for-height support in many more widgets (ex: GtkPanel, GtkMenuBar, GtkNotebook, etc); New experimental Wayland and HTML5 ‘Broadway’ backeds; GtkFileChooser and GtkAssistant received face-lifts; New widgets (ex: GtkLockButton and GtkOverlay, etc); ” openFATE Team Top voted Features “ decouple download and installation (Score: 368) Network installation could be improved by running package download and package installation in parallel. ” “ Look at plymouth for splash during boot (Score: 195) I wanted to open a fate feature about this when I first heard of plymouth, but reading http://fedoramagazine.wordpress.com/2008/10/21/interview-fedora-10s-better-startup/ really makes me think we should go this way. Ray’s comment starting with “Every flicker and mode change in the boot process takes away from the whole experience.” is especially interesting. Is it okay to track the “don’t show grub by default” here? ” “ 1-click uninstall (Score: 167) An easy way to remove Software! For example: you installed an application with “1-click install” (which will install all the packages that you need), there should be an easy way (also with 1 click) to remove what you have installed with that 1-click operation… in another words: an “1-click Uninstall” to remove installed software (dependencies and packages included). ” “ Update to GRUB v2 (Score: 157) Every single bug or feature that anyone has developed for GRUB 0.97 has been rejected by the upstream project in favor of using GRUB 2. There has been resisitence in the distribution community to switching boot loaders, but this stalemate isn’t going to go away. The code itself isn’t well written or well maintained. Adding a new feature involves jumping through a lot of hoops that may or may not work even if you manage to work around all the runtime limitations. For example, a fs implementation has a static buffer it can use for memory management. It’s only 32k. For complex file systems, or even a simple journaled file system, we run into problems (like the reiserfs taking forever to load bug) because we don’t have enough memory to do block mapping for the journal so it needs to scan it for every metadata read. (Yeah, really.) (…) ” “ Popularity contest (Score: 113) We need a feedback about packages that are preferred by users and actively used. Debian already has a tool named Popularity contest (popcon) * reusing popcon will give us results that are directly comparable with Debian and Ubuntu * packagers team can take care of the package * we need a configuration dialog in YaST that is visible enough * we need a server infrastructure on opensuse.org. (There are certain privacy issues, see Debian FAQ for details) ” Recently requested features Features newly requested last week. Please vote and/or comment if you get interested. “ Auto-lock with password when screen saver kicks in Enable automatic screen-lock with password required. E.g. after 5mins and 10seconds respectively add a default “lock” button to the GUI taskbar ” Feature Statistics Statistics for openSUSE distribution in openFATE Testing Team “ Larry Finger: Weekly News for October 08 The next meeting of the Testing Core Team will be October 10, 2011 at 17:00 UTC on Channel #opensuse-testing on the Freenode IRC Network (irc://irc.freenode.net/opensuse-testing). Our preliminary agenda includes our experiences with 12.1 Beta, and a discussion of the Beta Pizza Party. The Beta 1 release of 12.1 was released approximately one week ago and has been getting quite a bit of testing. On my systems, I have been doing updates from the Factory repos nearly every day. Most things are working without problems. ” Translation Team Daily updated translation statistics are available on the openSUSE Localization Portal. Trunk Top-List – Localization Guide In the Community▲▼ Postings from the Community “ Bruno Friedmann: 3 new virtual party on SecondLife for upcoming openSUSE 12.1 Ladies & Gentlemen, months after the first virtual party organized for 11.4 launch, Francoise (aka Morgane Marquis) and myself (tigerfoot) organize 3 new parties on SecondLife [4] to welcome and fest our next release openSUSE 12.1, coming around the 11.11.11. Three virtual great Saturday: October 22th, November 12th and December 10th. From 6 to 8am Australian DJ Ariella is back again. From 9 to 11am (SL time : utc-9) we will have the pleasure to listen American DJ Esquivel. You should take this opportunity to try Second Life, creating an avatar, coming to dance and drinking some beers with us at Geekos Place. (…) ” Welcome new openSUSE Members “ We are happy to announce the new openSUSE Members! abittner (abittner) ” Events & Meetings Upcoming No News! You can find more information on other events at: openSUSE News/Events. – Local Events openSUSE for your Ears The openSUSE Weekly News are available as podcast in German. You can hear it or download it on http://saigkill.homelinux.net/podcast. Communication The Mailinglists The openSUSE Forums Contributors openSUSE Connect Games Corner▲▼ The Section provides the Game of the Week, and Updates in the Game Repository “ Tux Arena/Craciun Dan: Xonotic – Free Shooter Based Off Nexuiz Xonotic is a free first-person shooter game for Linux, Windows and Mac OS X. The Xonotic project started as a fork of Nexuiz, a game which was popular for many years on Linux. The fork was created because Nexuiz was licensed to IllFonic game studios, and it is to be used as a platform for developing a commercial game for Steam, Xbox and PlayStation. Xonotic uses the Darkplaces game engine, an engine which started as a Quake modification, but it was under heavy development and new improvements were made. Currently the developers of Xonotic state that the game is “on the par with most commercial games from 2006-2007″. Which, for the Linux platform is pretty important. (…) ” “ Nelson Marques: Trine 2 coming for Linux? I’ve just noticed that Frozenbyte is already doing the beta for Trine 2, a fun platform game. The fun thing is that according to several sources on their forums they are planing to launch Trine 2 for Linux alongside with the Windows version or “shortly after”. I never heard of this game before and the video makes me remember of a very old DOS game called Goblins III. Either way the video is awesome and I’m pretty sure this is a potential purchase for my game collection. ” Security Updates▲▼ To view the security announcements in full, or to receive them as soon as they’re released, refer to the openSUSE Security Announce mailing list. “ openSUSE-SU-2011:1076-2: important: MozillaThunderbird: Update to Mozilla Thunderbird 3.1.14 Table 1. SUSE Security Announcement Package: Update to Mozilla Thunderbird 3.1.14 Announcement ID: openSUSE-SU-2011:1076-2 Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2011 15:08:20 0200 (CEST) Affected Products: openSUSE 11.4 openSUSE 11.3 Description: fixing various bugs and security issues. ” Kernel Review▲▼ “ Rares Aioanei: kernel weekly news – 08.10.2011 Rares gives his weekly Kernel Review with openSUSE Flavor. ” Tips and Tricks▲▼ For Desktop Users “ N.B.Prashanth: Customizing GNOME3 GNOME3 and the GNOME Shell are no doubt, major improvements. They bring in usability and quite a bit of eye candy (in a different way compared to compiz) while at the same time, a few features went missing in 3.0 release – like Emblems, for instance. Nevertheless, GNOME3 is a great release and has been extremely stable so far (Yes, i have been using it since it’s release in April.). One major complaint that I hear from people is that GNOME3 is not as easy to customize as 2.x. A lot of people seem to think that they are “stuck” with the blue-black theme that comes by default. Ofcourse this is not the case. In this post, I ll explain a few ways in which we can customize GNOME3 and the GNOME Shell. (…) ” “ Linuxaria: 4 programs to update your Blog from Linux Sometimes it’s useful to work offline, and once the article it’s finished publish it on your Blog. yes you can do it with an html editor, or also with a simple text editor like Vi or Emacs, but there are specialized programs that can ease your work of publishing and management of your online Blog. So we’ll take a look at Scribefire, BloGTK, Blogilo and Qumana. (…) ” For Commandline/Script Newbies “ Wazi/Carla Schroder: How to Find Anything Under Linux The Linux find, grep, and awk commands are amazing power tools for fine-grained file searches, and for finding things inside files. With them you can find the largest and newest files on a system, fine-tune search parameters, search for text inside files, and perform some slick user management tricks. (…) ” For Developers and Programmers “ The Geek Stuff/Himanshu Arora: Journey of a C Program to Linux Executable in 4 Stages You write a C program, use gcc to compile it, and you get an executable. It is pretty simple. Right? Have you ever wondered what happens during the compilation process and how the C program gets converted to an executable? There are four main stages through which a source code passes in order to finally become an executable. (…) ” For System Administrators “ IBM Developer Works/Tracy Bost: Learn Linux, 302 (Mixed environments): Internationalization If you work in a mixed environment in which non-English characters are used, you need to understand character codes and code pages as they relate to your locale. You also need to understand Linux and Windows environments differ when interpreting name spaces. Although Samba supports internationalization, if you work with older Windows clients , Samba 2.x versions, or otherwise need to use a specific character set other than Unicode, you’ll need to do a bit of configuration tuning. Depending upon the environment’s locale in use, building and patching conversion libraries may also be necessary. In this article, learn how to handle internationalization in your Linux environment. (…) ” “ ZDNET/Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: How to lock down Linux Linux is, by design, a very secure operating system, but so what? You can have the best security system in the world on your house, but if you leave your front-door open anyone can still walk in. Even people who know better, like Linux kernel developers, blow it sometimes. That’s what happened to the Linux Foundation’s constellation of sites. Multiple important Linux sites were down for weeks and as of October 3rd, kernel.org is still down. This doesn’t have to happen to you. Here are a few simple suggestions from me, and some more advanced ones from Greg Kroah-Hartman, one of Linux’s lead developers. (…) ” Planet SUSE▲▼ “ Andrew Wafaa: Hardware needed for openSUSE on ARM As I mentioned before, we have an initial target platform identified for testing the work of all those involved in the openSUSE ARM port. The problem is we need to obtain the hardware. I am in discussions trying to get some corporate sponsorship of hardware, but we can not rely soley on those kind companies that would like to see us succeed. We as a community need to help ourselves succeed, as such I’ve set up a campaign on Pledgie to enable us the community to contribute to the effort for obtaining hardware. (…) ” “ Gregory M. Zysk: Looking back at the openSUSE Conference 2011 (oSC) Well, once again, I had a chance to meet a community, one of which, I have never met before ;-) I arrived at Zentrifuge on the 10th of September for the warmup to the oSC. Immediately after arrival, I was greeted with warm smiles, open discussions, and cold beer ;-) No one knew who I was, but they all welcomed me. As the evening continued, I was witness to how the community also made sure that they welcomed everyone, once they arrived. This is pure class and I would like to say is very important to a newbie who is entering the community. This is one aspect where openSUSE makes the difference, since it is not practiced to this extent in many other communities. ” “ Gregory M. Zysk: openSUSE Marketing Hackfest 2011 On the 15th and 16 of September 2011, following the oSC, the marketing team held a Marketing Hackfest at the SUSE headquarters in Nuremberg, Germany. I was asked to attend this event for several reasons aside from the normal Marketing related things, two of which were the most important to me being new to this event. One, was to observe how the marketing team functions as a unit. And second, to hold meetings with different people to discuss certain issues with an outlook of solving them for the benefit of the openSUSE community. Moreover, many of us had a chance to further discuss (in person) initiatives started at the oSC, since we had a chance to digest them and come with some valuable input that was used to move things forward ;-) ” “ Sascha Manns: Balsam Professional 12.1 Boxdesign (based on openSUSE) Now it is out, our new Boxdesign: ” openSUSE Forums▲▼ “ openSUSE 12.1 Beta comments The development of openSUSE 12.1 has gone past the Milestones stage, and has now achieved Beta status. As usual there’s a lot of activity around this in the forums. If you’re interested in the comments. reports etc by forums members testing the release, this is the thread to watch. Some solutions for current issues can be found here as well. ” “ KDE 4.7 in Tumbleweed ? It’s already a while ago, that we were presented with openSUSE Tumbleweed, the rolling release version of openSUSE. Also a while ago, that KDE 4.7 was released. Yet, there’s still no KDE 4.7 in Tumbleweed, using the KDE:/Release: repos is not the way to go. Greg Kroah Hartman, maintainer of Tumbleweed, stated in one of the forums threads that there are some issues in KDE 4.7 that keep it from being in Tumbleweed. So, patience seems to be the best for now. Greg will probably let us know, when things get cleared. ” “ Adobe Flash 11 64-bit has finally been released to the public for download The title says it all. Adobe released a 64bit version of their Flash player 11. Some members report erronious behaviour, others, like me, have no issues. Read the thread to find out about the details ” “ openSUSE Language specific subforums: We now host the following language specific subforums under the umbrella of the openSUSE Forums: Main forums, english 中文(Chinese) Nederlands (Dutch) Français (French) Deutsch (German) Ελληνικό (Greek) Magyar (Hungarian) 日本語 (Japanese) Portuguese Pусский (Russian) ” On the Web▲▼ Reports “ TDF Blog: The Document Foundation publishes details of LibreOffice 3.4.3 security fixes The Internet, October 4, 2011 – The Document Foundation (TDF) publishes some details of the security fixes included with the recently released LibreOffice 3.4.3, and included in the older 3.3.4 version. Following industry best practice, details of security fixes are withheld until users have been given time to migrate to the new version. RedHat security researcher Huzaifa Sidhpurwala identified a memory corruption vulnerability in the code responsible for loading Microsoft Word documents in LibreOffice. This flaw could have been used for nefarious purposes, such as installing viruses, through a specially-crafted file. The corresponding vulnerability description is CVE-2011-2713,”Out-of-bounds property read in binary .doc filter”. (…) ” “ The Register/Dan Goodin: Check your machines for malware, Linux developers told Following a series of embarrassing intrusions that hit the servers used to maintain and distribute the Linux operating system, project elders have advised all developers to check their Linux machines for signs of compromise. Emails sent Friday by Linux kernel lead developers Greg Kroah-Hartman and H Peter Anvin arrived as volunteers with the open-source project worked to bring LinuxFoundation.org, Linux.com, and Kernel.org back online following attacks that gained root access to the multiple servers that host the sites. Among other things, project leaders are requiring all developers to regenerate the cryptographic keys used to upload source code to the site, and to ensure their systems are free of rootkits and other types of malware. (…) ” LOL “ like-a-boss.org: hacking the imperial death march One of the great things about the original Star Wars trilogy, was the “lived in”, junky, hacked together aesthetic of the Star Wars universe. Everything was a bit trashed, as if real people actually lived there. Thankfully, that’s one of the things that George Lucas hasn’t tinkered with in his endless quest to ruin the childhood memories of a generation. So it’s heartening to see this tradition carried on with the playing of the imperial death march on miscellaneous hacked together hardware. Enjoy … (…) ” Feedback▲▼ Do you have comments on any of the things mentioned in this article? Then head right over to the comment section and let us know! Or if you would like to be part of the openSUSE:Weekly news team then check out our team page and join! If you don’t know, how to contribute, just check out the Contribution Page. We have a Etherpad, which you can also use to sumbit news. Talk with us: Or Communicate with or get help from the wider openSUSE community via IRC, forums, or mailing lists see Communicate. Visit our connect.opensuse.org Page: and give your Feedback. Visit our Facebook Fanpage: Fanpage You also can submit via Bugtracking and Featurerequests for give your Feedback. Keep updated: You can subscribe to the openSUSE Weekly News RSS feed at news.opensuse.org. DOCS: Visit the official openSUSE docs page: docs.opensuse.org. Credits▲▼ We thank for this Issue: Sascha Manns, Editor in Chief Satoru Matsumoto, Editorial Office Gertjan Lettink, Forums Section Thomas Hofstätter, Eventeditor Thomas Schraitle, DocBook-Consultant Acknowledgements▲▼ We thank for this Issue: RenderX XEP, PDF Creation and Rendering SyncRO Soft Ltd., Oxygen XML Editing iJoomla, Surveys Copyrights▲▼ List of our Licenses Permission Information for own Trademarks SUSE ®, openSUSE ®, the openSUSE ® Logo and Novell ® are registered Trademarks of Novell, Inc. Linux ® is a registered Trademark of Linus Torvalds Translations▲ openSUSE Weekly News is translated into many languages. Issue 196 is available in: English Coming soon: Japanese Greek German Russian First published on: http://saigkill.homelinux.net ")); [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
    In this Issue: Beta1 of openSUSE 12.1 arrives Board Election ... [More] openSUSE @ ARM   You can download it there: Weekly News in PDF Format Weekly News in HTML (Bento Theme) Weekly News in HTML (Susebooks Theme) We hope you enjoy the reading :-) If you want to help us collecting interesting articles for the openSUSE Weekly News, so you can all your stuff into our new ietherpad: http://os-news.ietherpad.com/2. Found Bugs? Please place it in our Bugtracker: http://developer.berlios.de/bugs/?group_id=12095 Features, Ideas and Improvements can placed in our Featuretracker: http://developer.berlios.de/feature/?group_id=12095 Older content can be found there. [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
Declaring MMPC unsupported, nearly deathlike Quite surprised by receiving yet another feature request about the Maemo Music Player Client for the Maemo platform. I always got some mails here and then, but didn't receive one in quite a while. But ... [More] just that everybody knows: I hereby declare MMPC officially unsupported, not to say dead, stone-dead in particular. Nevertheless, it's nice to hear that the project still has (at least a few) users, so that I can say it has been a success after all. [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
Sometime ago I packaged Unknown Horizons (a RTS game based on FIFE Engine which uses openGL) for openSUSE and submitted it the openSUSE games repository. I’ve been lurking their project for while and I was asked if I could submit also a package for ... [More] Fedora, which I considered and I am going through the process right now (brc#718430). I have to say that in a way I am a lucky person in both projects, as in openSUSE most of my reviews are done by Vincent Untz and Dominique Leuenberger, in Fedora I got Tom Callaway, both two persons from which any starting contributor can learn a lot from. While openSUSE games repository provides a more relaxed packaging due to it’s own nature, Fedora has a more strict system. I don’t believe there is a right or wrong, it’s pretty much like traffic laws, some are quite reasonable, others are weird but we need to follow them. Both Fedora and openSUSE use quite different packaging tools, and since I was more comfortable with openSUSE Build Service, I’ve opened a small project (home:ketheriel:fedora), added a Fedora 15 repository and kicked off. While the package built pretty much according to what I expected, OBS doesn’t run Fedora rpmlint by default on the end of the packaging process, and I’m not really sure even if that’s possible without tinkering with it for bit. My first option was to install a Fedora 16 BETA system and check it out from the real thing (I got seduced by Verne’s wallpaper, which fits so well in GNOME3). After some thinking, and since swapping systems breaks a bit the joy, I’ve looked into my OBS project and tried to fix a nice workaround and eventually found it, it comes in two stages: rpmlint in BuildRequires – Add rpmlint to BuildRequires, so that it is installed on the buildroot. osc chroot and run rpmlint – After the build is complete, just run ‘osc chroot‘ and manually run rpmlint on the generated packages. On the spec file: BuildRequires:  Cython BuildRequires:  pkgconfig(libenet) >= 1.3.3 BuildRequires:  pkgconfig(python) # rpmlint for package checking after build BuildRequires:  rpmlint On the shell: nmarques@magtheridon:~/fedora/home:ketheriel:fedora/pyenet> osc chroot running: sudo chroot /var/tmp/build-root su - abuild -bash-4.2$ rpmlint ~/rpmbuild/SRPMS/pyetnet-0.0.0+svn24-0.fc15.src.rpm pyenet.src: I: enchant-dictionary-not-found en_US pyenet.src: W: invalid-url URL: http://code.google.com/p/pyenet <urlopen error [Errno -2] Name or service not known> pyenet.src: W: invalid-url Source0: pyenet-trunk-svn24.tar.bz2 1 packages and 0 specfiles checked; 0 errors, 2 warnings. -bash-4.2$ logout nmarques@magtheridon:~fedora/home:ketheriel:fedora/pyenet> Though this isn’t a trick, it really took me up a few days to see this option. Fedora 16 BETA looks great, I didn’t had much issues, but it’s nice to feel at home with OBS. As the reviews for Fedora go for 2 packages, unknown horizons and pyenet, we are a few steps closer of also providing Unknown Horizons in Fedora, please upstream and Unknown Horizons users. [Less]
Posted about 11 years ago
Now it is out, our new Boxdesign: