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Posted almost 12 years ago by Sally
Who: The Apache Software Foundation (ASF): all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of nearly 150 Open Source projects and initiatives. What: In development for nearly 10 years, and an ASF Top-Level Project since 2003, Apache Maven ... [More] is the build system of choice for millions of developers and thousands of organizations world-wide. Why: Maven 3 represents the culmination of nearly two years of work re-architecting the internals of the system based on experience gained over the last five years with Maven 2.x. Maven 3 is faster, more reliable, and more extensible, with users already reporting 10-40% improvements in build time over Maven 2. "A key priority for our users was backward compatibility," said Brian Fox, Vice President of Apache Maven. "We've invested a significant amount of time and effort to ensure a smooth transition while maintaining backward compatibility with Maven 2 builds and plugins." Highlights of the release include: Parallel build capability Conversion of IoC system from Plexus to Guice, including a Plexus compatibility layer Rewritten dependency resolution logic, designed to be extensible and embedded in other applications Improved POM validation during the build to warn users of potential problems Improved error handling and messages Decoupled reporting engine from the core New inheritance and interpolation code designed to be extensible and allow composition of POMs in future releases More robust handling of local repository data True plugin classpath isolation Massively improved regression test suite for Maven core and plugins Further details are available at http://maven.apache.org/docs/3.0/release-notes.html When: Apache Maven 3 was released on 8 October 2010 In addition, Apache Maven training will be held on 1 November at ApacheCon in Atlanta, Georgia. Where: Apache Maven 3 is released under the Apache License v2.0, and available for download at http://maven.apache.org/ For details on Maven training visit http://apachecon.com [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by Sally
ApacheCon, the official conference, trainings, expo, hackathon, barcamp and meetups of The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), today announced the keynote presenters and sponsors for ApacheCon North America. This year's event takes place 1-5 ... [More] November 2010 at the Westin Peachtree in Atlanta, Georgia, with numerous early registration incentives available through Friday, 8 October 2010. The conference theme, "Servers, The Cloud, and Innovation", showcases an array of ASF-developed Open Source projects, community practices, and business solutions. Keynote addresses will be presented by:   Dana Blankenhorn, Linux and Open Source Writer, ZDNet – Wednesday, 3 November, 9AM Daniel Crichton, Program Manager and Principal Computer Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory – Thursday, 4 November 11.30AM Dr. Bob Sutor, Vice President of Open Systems and Linux, IBM Corporation – Friday, 4 November 12.30PM     Apache developers, users, enthusiasts, software architects, administrators, executives, and community managers will learn to successfully develop, deploy, and leverage existing and emerging Open Source technologies critical to their businesses. Hands-on trainings and general conference sessions will cover in-depth dozens of Apache products such as Cassandra, Geronimo, Hadoop, Lucene, Tomcat, and the Apache HTTP Server. Special events during the week include BarCampApache, Hackathon, MeetUps, expo hall, receptions, and ample networking opportunities with peers and new connections. Both BarCampApache and ASF Project MeetUps are open to the public free of charge. ApacheCon Gold sponsor HotWax Media and Silver sponsor Hewlett-Packard are joined byexhibitors and sponsors that include: CollabNet, Day Software, Facebook, Hippo, IBM, Lucid Imagination, Ning, Progress Fuse, Rackspace, SpringSource, The Apache Software Foundation, WSO2, and Yahoo!. For sponsor, exhibitor, and community partnership opportunities, contact Delia Frees at delia@apachecon.com. Media registration is available for members of the press with valid credentials. Contact Sally Khudairi at sk@apache.org for more information. Early-bird registration incentives include savings of up to $150 with the Hotel+Registration package, 20% off Full-Conference+Trainings Immersion, and group registration rates. For the complete list of sessions and to register, visit http://apachecon.com/ and follow the@ApacheCon feed on Twitter. About The Apache Software Foundation (ASF)Established in 1999, the all-volunteer ASF oversees nearly one hundred fifty leading Open Source projects, including Apache HTTP Server — the world's most popular Web server software, powering more than 130 Million Websites worldwide. Today, more than 300 individual Members and 2,300 Committers successfully collaborate to develop freely available enterprise-grade software, benefiting millions of users worldwide through thousands of software solutions distributed under the Apache License. The community actively participates in ASF mailing lists, mentoring initiatives, and ApacheCon, the Foundation's official user conference, trainings, and expo. The ASF is funded by individual donations and corporate sponsors that include AMD, Basis Technology, Facebook, Google, HP, Microsoft, Progress Software, VMware, and Yahoo!. Additional sponsors include Matt Mullenweg, AirPlus International, BlueNog, Intuit, Joost, and Two Sigma Investments. More information is available at http://www.apache.org/, theannounce@apache.org mailing list, the ASF Blog, and the @TheASF feed on Twitter. # # # [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by Sally
ApacheCon, the official conference, trainings, expo, hackathon, barcamp and meetups of The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), today announced the keynote presenters and sponsors for ApacheCon North America. This year's event takes place 1-5 November ... [More] 2010 at the Westin Peachtree in Atlanta, Georgia, with numerous early registration incentives available through Friday, 8 October 2010. The conference theme, "Servers, The Cloud, and Innovation", showcases an array of ASF-developed Open Source projects, community practices, and business solutions. Keynote addresses will be presented by: Dana Blankenhorn, Linux and Open Source Writer, ZDNet – Wednesday, 3 November, 9AM Daniel Crichton, Program Manager and Principal Computer Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory – Thursday, 4 November 11.30AM Dr. Bob Sutor, Vice President of Open Systems and Linux, IBM Corporation – Friday, 4 November 12.30PM Apache developers, users, enthusiasts, software architects, administrators, executives, and community managers will learn to successfully develop, deploy, and leverage existing and emerging Open Source technologies critical to their businesses. Hands-on trainings and general conference sessions will cover in-depth dozens of Apache products such as Cassandra, Geronimo, Hadoop, Lucene, Tomcat, and the Apache HTTP Server. Special events during the week include BarCampApache, Hackathon, MeetUps, expo hall, receptions, and ample networking opportunities with peers and new connections. Both BarCampApache and ASF Project MeetUps are open to the public free of charge. ApacheCon Gold sponsor HotWax Media and Silver sponsor Hewlett-Packard are joined by exhibitors and sponsors that include: CollabNet, Day Software, Facebook, Hippo, IBM, Lucid Imagination, Ning, Progress Fuse, Rackspace, SpringSource, The Apache Software Foundation, WSO2, and Yahoo!. For sponsor, exhibitor, and community partnership opportunities, contact Delia Frees at delia@apachecon.com. Media registration is available for members of the press with valid credentials. Contact Sally Khudairi at sk@apache.org for more information. Early-bird registration incentives include savings of up to $150 with the Hotel+Registration package, 20% off Full-Conference+Trainings Immersion, and group registration rates. For the complete list of sessions and to register, visit http://apachecon.com/ and follow the @ApacheCon feed on Twitter. About The Apache Software Foundation (ASF)Established in 1999, the all-volunteer ASF oversees nearly one hundred fifty leading Open Source projects, including Apache HTTP Server — the world's most popular Web server software, powering more than 130 Million Websites worldwide. Today, more than 300 individual Members and 2,300 Committers successfully collaborate to develop freely available enterprise-grade software, benefiting millions of users worldwide through thousands of software solutions distributed under the Apache License. The community actively participates in ASF mailing lists, mentoring initiatives, and ApacheCon, the Foundation's official user conference, trainings, and expo. The ASF is funded by individual donations and corporate sponsors that include AMD, Basis Technology, Facebook, Google, HP, Microsoft, Progress Software, VMware, and Yahoo!. Additional sponsors include Matt Mullenweg, AirPlus International, BlueNog, Intuit, Joost, and Two Sigma Investments. More information is available at http://www.apache.org/, the announce@apache.org mailing list, the ASF Blog, and the @TheASF feed on Twitter. # # # [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by pctony
Yesterday, the main ASF SVN code repository passed the 1 million commit mark. Shortly thereafter one of the ASF members enquired as to how he could best grab the svn log entries for all of these commits. As always there were a bunch of useful ... [More] replies, but they were all set to take quite some time; mainly because if anyone just simply runs svn log http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf -r1:1000000 It will not only take several hours, it will also cause high levels of load on one of the two geo-balanced SVN servers. Also, requesting that many log entries will likely result in your IP address being banned. So I decided to create the log set locally on one of the SVN servers. This is now available for download [http://s.apache.org/1m-svnlog] [md5] This is a 50Mb tar/gz file. It will uncompress to about 240Mb. The log 'only' contains the log entries from 1 -> 1,000,000 - if you want the rest you can run: svn log http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf -r1000001:HEAD This will give you all the log entries from 1M+1 to current [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by Sally
The Apache Software Foundation reached its millionth revision milestone today with a commit by ASF Member Yonik Seeley on behalf of the Apache Lucene Project:  lucene/ r1000000 yonik SOLR-2128: full param substitution for function queries ... [More] The all-volunteer ASF oversees nearly one hundred fifty leading Open Source projects, including Apache HTTP Server — the world's most popular Web server software, powering more than 130 Million Websites worldwide. Today, more than 300 individual Members and 2,300 Committers successfully collaborate to develop freely available enterprise-grade software, benefiting millions of users worldwide: thousands of software solutions are distributed under the Apache License; and the community actively participates in ASF mailing lists, mentoring initiatives, and ApacheCon, the Foundation's official user conference, trainings, and expo, taking place 1-5 November 2010 in Atlanta, Georgia. The ASF is funded by individual donations and corporate sponsors that include AMD, Basis Technology, Facebook, Google, HP, Microsoft, Progress Software, VMware, and Yahoo!. Additional sponsors include Matt Mullenweg, AirPlus International, BlueNog, Intuit, Joost, and Two Sigma Investments. Infrastructure at the ASF is overseen by the Apache Infrastructure team, with server hosting and bandwidth provided by Oregon State University Open Source Lab (USA) and SURFnet (EU), and VM hosting and bandwith for AU svn mirror provided by Neural Networks (AU). Secondary DNS provided by No-IP Managed DNS, develooper.com manages the bitnames DNS services. Hyperreal.org is our other provider. Apache servers have been donated by Sun and IBM. More information is available at http://www.apache.org/ , the announce@apache.org mailing list, the ASF Blog, and the @TheASF feed on Twitter. # # #  [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by markt
The Apache Tomcat team has released 5.5.31. Tomcat 5.5.30 contained a couple of regressions (bug 49647 and bug 49718) which broke JavaMail resources and HTTP 0.9 requests. Both of these issues are fixed in 5.5.31. In addition, 5.5.31 contains a ... [More] handful of bug fixes and enhancements. As always, the Tomcat 5.5 change log has the details of all the fixes that went into this release and previous releases. Tomcat 5.5.31 can be obtained from the Tomcat 5.5.x download page. [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by bimargulies
The Apache Software Foundation exists to provide legal and technological infrastructure for open source projects. By and large, the Foundation leaves the individual project communities to make their own choices about their development process. There ... [More] are some constraints that result from the fundamental legal umbrella held by the Foundation. For the Foundation to protect contributors, projects must respect the rules regarding IP management and releases. A more interesting set of constraints, however, stems from the Foundation’s commitment to Open Source software development as a communal process. Apache projects are communities, and some of the few pan-Foundation norms exist to ensure transparent, fair, collegial, decision-making processes.Roughly speaking, the two pillars of the Apache community model are mailing lists and consensus process. The mailing list policy is simple enough. Community decisions must be reached on the mailing list. This allows anyone in the community, whatever their location or time zone, to participate. Consensus is a more complex matter.At a first glance, consensus process is defined by the veto. When an important matter it put to a vote, even one ‘-1’ vote blocks progress. This seems like a recipe for gridlock. It isn’t. It could be, if the consensus process consisted only of veto rights. Consensus wasn’t invented, of course, at Apache. The most famous example of consensus process is the Quaker Meeting, though many organizations have adopted and adapted it since. In a consensus-based organization, you’ll hardly ever hear someone use the term ‘veto’. Instead, you will hear the phrase, ‘block consensus’. And, from these two words, we can unpack the larger model of consensus.The goal of consensus is make decisions that are acceptable to everyone in the group. ‘Acceptable,’ not ‘ideal.’ For a consensus organization to function, all the participants have to be willing to balance their personal views with the good of the group. Anyone can block consensus -- but blocking consensus is not a choice that anyone takes lightly.People being people, this is not a natural state of affairs. People disagree. A functional consensus process requires a group of people who are willing to spend as much time as it takes to reach complete agreement -- where ‘complete agreement’ is defined as ‘acceptable to everyone.’ Consensus groups discuss a decision, at length, until someone thinks that the group has reached a consensus. At this point, the moderator asks, ‘do we have a consensus’? Silence, at this point, defines success.The process I just described was built, over many years, for face-to-face meetings. At Apache, project decisions aren’t made at face-to-face meetings, but rather on mailing lists. Further, Apache projects are full of impatient programmers. Silence, then, is not a practical measurement. ASF projects use two adjustments to classic consensus process to adapt it to the Foundation’s needs: the three-valued vote and ‘lazy’ consensus.When an Apache Project Management Committee needs to make an important, binding, hard-to-reverse decision, such as declaring a release, it holds a vote. Members vote -1, 0, or 1.Any member of the committee can block consensus by voting ‘-1’. Without face-to-face meetings, Apache projects need a way to tell if, in fact, enough people are in favor of an decision to justify proceeding. Face-to-face, this might be left to the judgement of a moderator. At Apache, this is the job of the two other voting options: ‘0’ and ‘+1’. A vote of ‘+1’ is a positive endorsement of the proposal, while a vote of ‘0’ is an abstention. Different situations require different minimum numbers of +1 votes.If a three-valued vote is a more formal, electoral, sort of event than a traditional consensus process, the ‘lazy’ consensus is just the opposite -- a means of making a decision without any explicit decision-making process at all. Many projects use lazy consensus for routine, reversible, decisions. The group has an existing consensus on an overall approach, and individual members go ahead and make the day-to-day decisions without stopping to poll their peers. The most common application of lazy consensus is software development itself. In a project using lazy consensus, a committer will post a patch and notify the list. Absent any objection, she goes ahead and checks it in. Now, in some sense, this is just like classic consensus; silence is consent. Some projects take this a step further. Committers go ahead and commit routine changes. If someone objects, the original committer backs the change out. Some objections result in a discussion followed, perhaps, by removing the change, and others result in reverting followed by discussion. The net result is that committers can progress on the work at hand without having to wait around for approval. This process is not a magic cure for human nature. Apache projects suffer from disputes and dissension just like everyone else. The consensus rules, however, encourage collegial behavior (the goal is to convince everyone, not to assemble a majority block). And, in the worse case, they serve as a firewall. If an Apache community grinds to a halt due to an abject inability to reach consensus, it will be painfully obvious from the voting records, and the board can take note and act. [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by markt
You may have seen that the Tomcat project participated in the Google Summer of Code (GSOC) this year. This year, Chamith Buddhika has been working on improving the JMX support. In particular the aims were: Aligning the attributes and methods ... [More] exposed via JMX with reality. The JMX descriptions and the actual code had diverged over time and there were many missing entries as well as entries that no longer worked. Making it possible to fully configure a Tomcat instance over JMX. It is this second objective that I am writing about today. With the most recent changes to Tomcat 7 trunk (you'll need to build from svn or wait until 7.0.3 to use these features) it is now possible to start an absolute bare minimum Tomcat instance and perform all the configuration via JMX. To try this out for yourself, you'll need to start with a standard Tomcat install (if building from trunk the contents of output/build will be fine) and reduce server.xml to the bare minimum. Something like this: <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?> <Server port="8005" shutdown="SHUTDOWN"> </Server> Then start Tomcat along with JConsole and connect JConsole to your newly started Tomcat instance. In the MBean tab in JConsole, you should see a number of Tomcat MBeans including one named "Catalina:type=MBeanFactory". Navigate to this MBean and use the "createStandardServiceEngine" method to create a Service and an Engine. There is a one-to-one mapping between Service and Engine so they are created together. For domain and defaultHost I use the standard values "Catalina" and "localhost" respectively. You can change these if you wish. baseDir must be the full path to CATALINA_BASE. The next step is to add a Host to the Engine, configure the Host and start it. To add the Host, navigate to the Engine you just created and use the addChild operation. The type should be "org.apache.catalina.core.StandardHost" and the name must match the name you used for the defaultHost attribute when creating the Engine. The default configuration for the Host should allow you to start it, so navigate to the new Host element and use the start operation. You should see all the Contexts found in webapps being automatically deployed. Finally, you need to add a Connector so you can test your configuration. Navigate to the Service element you created earlier and select the addConnector operation. If you don't specify an address, the Connector will listen on all IP addresses assigned to the machine where Tomcat is running. You must specify a port (I used the standard value of 8080) and you'll want to set isAjp and isSSL to false. With this complete, you should be able to point your browser at localhost:8080 and see the standard Tomcat ROOT application. The main purpose of improving the JMX features was to allow management tools better visibility and control over Tomcat instances. For example, a management tool could keep track of the current required configuration and dynamically configure the Tomcat instance via JMX both while the instance is running and when the instance is restarted. This would allow a management tool to have full control over a Tomcat instance's configuration without having to keep the management tool's view of the Tomcat configuration and the instance's server.xml file in sync. The JMX improvements are still a work in progress. There are still a number of operations and attributes that don't work correctly. As always patches to improve the situation are very welcome. If you'd like to get involved in this effort - or any other aspect of Tomcat development - please subscribe to the Tomcat dev list and drop the developer community a note. [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by Sally
At the Apache Software Foundation Board Meeting held this morning, the following members were elected to serve as the new Executive Officers of the ASF effective immediately: - Doug Cutting, Chairman- Jim Jagielski, President- Greg Stein, Vice ... [More] Chairman- Noirin Shirley, Executive Vice President- Geir Magnusson, Jr., Treasurer- Craig Russell, Secretary- Sam Ruby, Assistant Secretary For more information on the Foundation's operations and its structure, see http://apache.org/foundation/how-it-works.html#structure [Less]
Posted almost 12 years ago by sabob
ClickIDE 2.2.0.0 is now available! ClickIDE is an Eclipse plug-in for the developing Click web applications. This version supports Apache Click 2.2.0 and fixes some minor issues. For details about ClickIDE see: ... [More] http://click.apache.org/docs/click-ide.html Download is available here: http://click.apache.org/docs/click-ide-downloads.html Enjoy Click! [Less]